^
Il est tard. Je cherche mon autre chez-moi, et je prends un chemin que je ne connais pas:
Un petit sentier qui longe les usines et la ville entre-coupant par la forêt.
Je commence à peine à entrevoir la nature, lorsque tout d'un coup, la nuit tombe.
ffffffound:

(no title)
visualgraphc:

Laand
toothpastecomics:

Fucked up snacks. From Toothpaste For Dinner.

toothpastecomics:

Fucked up snacks. From Toothpaste For Dinner.

nevver:

Todd Norsten
nevver:

Peanuts

sagansense:

Apollo XVII Mission - December 7-19, 1972

via boomerstarkiller67

(via voice-s)

sagansense:


Tiny Drops of Hot Quark Soup—How Small Can They Be?
New analyses of deuteron-gold collisions at RHIC reveal that even small particles can create big surprises
Scientists designed and built the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory to create and study a form of matter that last existed a fraction of a second after the Big Bang, some 13.8 billion years ago. The early-universe matter is created when two beams of gold nuclei traveling close to the speed of light slam into one another. The high-speed particle smashups pack so much energy into such a tiny space that the hundreds of protons and neutrons making up the nuclei “melt” and release their constituent particles—quarks and gluons—so scientists can study these building blocks of matter as they existed at the dawn of time.
Continue Reading

via thenewenlightenmentage

sagansense:

Tiny Drops of Hot Quark Soup—How Small Can They Be?

New analyses of deuteron-gold collisions at RHIC reveal that even small particles can create big surprises

Scientists designed and built the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory to create and study a form of matter that last existed a fraction of a second after the Big Bang, some 13.8 billion years ago. The early-universe matter is created when two beams of gold nuclei traveling close to the speed of light slam into one another. The high-speed particle smashups pack so much energy into such a tiny space that the hundreds of protons and neutrons making up the nuclei “melt” and release their constituent particles—quarks and gluons—so scientists can study these building blocks of matter as they existed at the dawn of time.

Continue Reading

via thenewenlightenmentage